Lycos, Yahoo, Mosaic Explains why HBCUs are a Joke to the Black Community

dillard Historically Black Colleges and Universities are currently a pathetic joke and cats can love their dancing bands and mocha complexion student body all they want, but they still a damn joke. These HBCUs are known for sitting around hazing young Black students and cats walking around their HBCU acting like they better than each other in their joke campus environment. We currently do not recommend any child, especially your child attend a HBCU at this time. We already explained why HBCUs are a joke and covered this topic when cats wanted to get upset Dr. Dre gave $35 million endowment to USC. I wouldn’t give an HBCU $35 because I see how pathetic these institutions are and they doing nothing but taking young Black folks student loan and student grant money and claiming they are a traditional establishment. Then they crying for Obama and Tom Joyner to fund them and please stop the ALEC states to stop funding and closing down HBCUs like parental-seeking dependent institutions that are not independent. Their alumni ain’t sh*t either, proud to graduate from there and like to run off at the mouth but always happen to ain’t got the big money to contribute back to the HBCU to help grow the institution. Come on, watch the HBCU cats come to this blog and start talking up some BS like they got talking points why HBCUs ain’t garbage. Watch how they point out one or two people as an exception as everybody knows Black people love anecdotal arguments the same way b*tches love cake. BTW, an anecdotal argument is when a Black person say “I have a cousin/friend/sister who did [whatever] and they [succeeded]” and think this is a valid argument to present as fact to a discussion. Sounds like HBCU education right there using anecdotal, just saying. The Birth of the World Wide Web Here is the reason we are officially declaring all HBCUs a joke – let’s go back to the birth of the Internet in the early to mid-nineties. The Internet was all basically .edu and .mil back in the day and there was no .com back then. Yahoo was a domain under Standford .edu address. Lycos was underneath the Carnegie-Mellon University address and Mosaic was the first web browser built at University of Illinois at Champaign. Let’s verify the statements with Wikipedia: Yahoo! was started in a Stanford University campus trailer.[1] It was founded in January 1994 by Jerry Yang and David Filo, who were Electrical Engineering graduate students when they created a website named "Jerry and David's Guide to the World Wide Web". The Guide was a directory of other websites, organized in a hierarchy, as opposed to a searchable index of pages. In April 1994, Jerry and David's Guide to the World Wide Web was renamed "Yahoo!". Lycos is a university spin-off that began as a research project by Michael Loren Mauldin of Carnegie Mellon University's main Pittsburgh campus in 1994. Mosaic was developed at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA)[5] at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign beginning in late 1992. NCSA released the browser in 1993,[7] and officially discontinued development and support on January 7, 1997.[8] And by the way, the first African-American online resource was started in 1994 at Georgia Tech and I remember Georgia Tech has a strong pioneer based of brothas and sistas down there back in the day, convincing me that Atlanta was where to be at and why I’m in Atlanta today. That is real talk. University Spin-Off If you noticed the Lycos description, there is a term called “university spin-off” and that term alone is the reason why HBCUs are a damn pathetic joke and I wouldn’t pay for a cat to learn how to chase mice at these institutions. When you are finish reading what a university spin-off is, you will begin to put two-and-two together and see exactly why we have zero respect for HBCUs and their phony academic leadership and even further, the lazy ass Black student body there with their black fraternity and sororities doing their step shows, quasi-religious and quasi-socialist nut cases, self-important academic staff and the majority of Black students who only went there because their mom/dad went there and now they secretly trying to transfer to the University of Texas. Let’s look at what a university spin-off is: University spin-offs transform technological inventions developed from university research that are likely to remain unexploited otherwise.[1] As such, university/academic spin-offs are a subcategory of research spin-offs. Prominent examples of university spin-offs are Genentech, Crucell, Lycos and Plastic Logic. In most countries, universities can claim the intellectual property (IP) rights on technologies developed in their laboratories. This IP typically draws on patents or, in exceptional cases, copyrights. Therefore, the process of establishing the spin-off as a new corporation involves transferring the IP to the new corporation or giving the latter a license on this IP. University spin-offs typically go through a number of critical steps to develop the initial invention into a successful business venture. The following steps are critical in creating a successful spin-off (not necessarily in this order).[2]
  • Developing a proof of concept, or proof of principle, that demonstrates that the invented method or new theory is probably useful in a particular application - for example a new product.
  • Developing a fully functioning prototype of this new product; the prototype also serves to learn about how to produce, use and sell the new product.
  • Attracting startup funding to finance the development of prototypes and new products; this may involve acquiring financial resources from venture capital firms, angel Investors, banks, or other providers of early-stage financial capital.
  • Developing a successful business model for the spin-off; a business model depicts the rationale of how the spin-off will create, deliver and capture value.
  • Acquiring the first customers. The first customer, also called an early adopter, can provide candid feedback to help the spin-off refine future product releases and also provide access to a distribution channel or other forms of support.
carver When you see these same Black folks keep talking about George Washington Carver, Booker T Washington and so on with a smile on their face, they do not realize these Black inventors from the late 1800s to early 1900s learned to invent in a university spin-off environment where they learned to innovate. We can be honest, almost 100% of the Black inventors, real inventors that Tom Joyner be talking about, were created out of White institutions doing university spin-off methods. Ain’t Expensive or Hard to Create a HBCU 21st Century Innovation Lab univ_arizona_innovation_lab All of you people coming here to Dream and Hustle and see the solutions we are researching and doing for Black folks – why isn’t the HBCUs and other Black schools facilitating this kind of innovation culture among their Black student body? What’s so damn expensive about a $5/month GoDaddy account and if I’m correct, most of these HBCUs can get a government grant to buy server equipment and other technology to create these labs. HBCUs academic leadership could be creating innovation labs out of empty spaces and get their student body time to go in and create innovative stuff for the Black community or African Diaspora or even a bigger purpose. If someone at the HBCU invent something, the HBCU can hold the patents as a deal in the university spin-off creating a revenue stream for them. That is a fair deal and both a win-win for the HBCU inventor that created modular retail shops out of shipping containers to establish pop-up economic centers in dilapidated areas and the HBCU who hold the patent and receive the royalty as other implement it. But let’s be honest – Black people and HBCUs or any part of a strong Black culture truly hate Black entrepreneurship and don’t want to see other Black people inventing anything. These HBCU like to see instead someone catch a football pass and then they jump for joy and start dancing with the HBCU hype band. Or they want to just read about Marcus Garvey or George Washington Carver and Booker T Washington. My favorite is these stories of 13-15 year old Black kids creating tech firms and mobile apps, how touching. But Sherry Jackson, a sophomore from Mississippi who is working on creating an exchange to maintain food security in the Black community, no one wants to hear that shit – that’s how the Black community thinks and act, especially at HBCUs. Until HBCUs Take University Spin-Offs Seriously, F*ck Them fu_hbcu You guys have just been briefed why HBCUs ain’t worth talking about and are garbage. Until the HBCUs start taking innovation in the Black community seriously, they will remain nothing more than a joke taking Black kids student loan and grant money and pretending to give them an education and college experience. HBCUs are reflective of the Black community where Black people love good stories but hate seeing Black people working hard at entrepreneurial and innovation to create solutions. There is no damn way an HBCU academic staff have a good excuse why they did not create a true innovation lab and have no university spin-offs to show for it. You on the other hand – you know damn well just graduating with a college degree is not going to guarantee anybody a job nowadays. You also know damn well we need Black entrepreneurs and Black businesses to create jobs for brothas and sistas. So why is there an ignorant ass Dean called Sid Creadle at Hampton University telling our young kids they cannot wear braids and cornrows so they can be presentable to a corporate employers instead of teaching them to be entrepreneurs? And why the f*ck the student body at Hampton and their parents putting up with this sh*t? Throw that Sid Creadle out of that Hampton University on his damn behind and stop acting like a coward ass punk! HBCUs can buy empty buildings in hood commercial zones cheaply and do research on how to create economic revitalization for places like Detroit for example. The students can learn retail technology or mobile app development while in school getting education grants and funding, create software solutions and then package it to be sold worldwide and the students start a global enterprise, create retail jobs or mobile apps and the HBCU has a patent and has IP revenue stream instead of begging Dr. Dre for money. That is called creating an innovation culture to solve our problems and the HBCUs are a critical role but ain’t doing nothing. Don’t blame the Black church, blame the HBCUs. So when your kid apply to any HBCU college or university, you better ask the HBCU to show you where the HBCU innovation center is to encourage collective solution building among brothas and sistas and entrepreneurship. Mention the Harvard i-Lab, mention how Lycos and Yahoo was started at university research centers. Explain to them that the PBS Antique Road Show started in the i-Lab at Harvard and created other shows like Pawn Shop and Storage Wars. Tell them Black schools in Nigeria now got start-up innovation labs to drive economic development and tech entrepreneurs, make sure you look at their reaction. Make sure you look these HBCUs cats dead in their eye when you explain to them you want your Black child to have entrepreneurial exposure, not a paper degree to go look for work and stand in an unemployment line with other paper degree cats when the economy is bad. And if the HBCU cannot show you an innovation lab or track record of university spin-offs, you better tell that HBCU to screw off and get your kid into the University of Texas while enrollment period is still open. Until these HBCUs start talking university spin-off seriously and create a culture to foster innovation among their student body and got something to show and tell, they better not ask me or Dr. Dre for a damn thing.

61 thoughts on “Lycos, Yahoo, Mosaic Explains why HBCUs are a Joke to the Black Community

  1. They mad lol. I attended some of these institutions u mentioning but didnt finish because some of the same exact reasoning u mentioning. I could go on but u pit it in a nutshell.

  2. 1.”These HBCUs are known for sitting around hazing young Black students and cats walking around their HBCU acting like they better than each other in their joke campus environment.”
    -are you suggesting that these state schools and ivy league colleges do not engage in the same behavior? If your answer is yes, then you’re a fool.

    2.You feed into the stereotypical ideology of “the white man’s ice is colder”
    3. Can you produce the data that showed that you went to all the HBCU’s to interview them to see if they are trying do develop a “spin off model”?
    4. If you encourage people to not attend an HBCU, what is the impetus to develop a “spin off model” for black students.
    5. You still don’t underscore the amount of healthcare practitioners HBCU’s produce that actually comeback to practice in impoverished black neighborhoods, that whites avoid. Have you ever been to Howard University Hospital and seen their staff,versus Georgetown Hospital. Less than 15% of the doctors at Howard Hospital are white, mostly all black staff that serve a black community.
    6. To discredit an institution because they lack a specific model that you find important is ridiculous. One model does not define the greatness or lack thereof in an institution.

    7. Since you feel so deep about this, and feel the need to berate HBCU’s, I’ll be sure to forward this article to all my fellow HBCU associates that could’ve been potential customers, or network groups for you Mr. ED, I will especially be sure to circulate this to all my peeps in the ATL and Pan Hell greek council,……to boycott your pursuit, since we are so stupid.
    8. A more constructive approach to the article would be, ” How Dream and Hustle’s Network can improve the quality of HBCU’s by integrating a Spin-Off Model”………….however you took the negative side and now look just as condescending as you tried to describe us. Especially notify all the greek sororities that had potential for Sista-sphere.
    9. You sound bitter and scorned, I would love for you to post when Dream and Hustle has collaborated with an HBCU to showcase how a spin-off would work. Criticizing without trying help is poison.

    1. Everything u say here is true, but HBCU’s suck hard and they suck real hard because the main focus is on party, football and Band and Social Life. More so than at other Universities. This is not ever going to be a debate that this is not happening. Even a cheap 2 yr community college prep students better to go on for their Bachelors Degree in a better way than a HBCU can do it. They are better off not have ever gone to one but actually going to a school based on what they are going to Major in.

    2. A. Wilburn says: Since you feel so deep about this, and feel the need to berate HBCU’s, I’ll be sure to forward this article to all my fellow HBCU associates that could’ve been potential customers, or network groups for you Mr. ED, I will especially be sure to circulate this to all my peeps in the ATL and Pan Hell greek council,……to boycott your pursuit, since we are so stupid.

      A. Wilburn, this is an asinine and divisive statement. Ed has the right to call HBCUs or anyone else a joke or even stupid if he feels that way. I don’t entirely agree with him but let’s be fair, he did give us an opportunity to prove him wrong. There is no need to be divisive or inflammatory. It is that kind of divisiveness over ideas and methods that has prevented the Black community from working together to collectively address and solve issues in our community. I guess it never dawns on us that there is more than one way to solve our issues (and we have enough of them to divide and conquer). I don’t care if you are Ed Dunn, Nat Turner, Malcolm X, Claude Anderson, or Bill Gates. As long as you genuinely want to benefit the empowerment of Black people I don’t care what your methodology is.

  3. everybody knows Black people love anecdotal arguments the same way b*tches love cake

    lol, priceless….,

    didn’t take long to pull a d-riding faggot busy scolding, threatening to tattle, and begging – all at the same time…,

    1. CNu, it didn’t take long but i didn’t expect this kind of fish to flop in the boat! This is what this comedy character wrote:

      “Until you furnish your productivity , keep posting blogs and HBCUs will continue graduating professionals ripe with knowledge, degrees, and vision.”

      Notice the word “innovation” is missing. Knowledge? Degrees? Vision? – at first I thought this clown was a C- grade average HBCU student looking for a troll moment, but who uses the term “knowledge, degrees, vision” except a faculty member who is not in the real world?

      My perspective of HBCU education changed from that one dude posting..the way he talking and demanding someone show him something is how they teach these people how to act and think around other Black people..

      HBCUs probably need to be studied further to understand this crazy ass behavior when Black people get together and doing everything else except working together to create collective progress. I’m seriously convinced now that HBCUs are negative environment that do not promote innovation. Then we looking at HBCU faculty that are more likely sucking at the teat and can careless about the HBCU student body the same way Black public school teachers treat Black students in the inner city.

  4. “Mr. ED, I will especially be sure to circulate this to all my peeps in the ATL and Pan Hell greek council,……to boycott your pursuit, since we are so stupid.”

    No problem, just make sure you make it clear to everybody the reason you want to boycott me because you guys are not creating innovative solutions and mad someone calling you out on it. That really sound stupid, btw. Guess you didn’t read the memo that we already outsourced the Black empowerment movement to the Philippines because I thought you guys were not cut out for the work needed to be done.

    How embarrassing the first thing come out of your mouth is “boycott” like Black people have some damn economic power that mean something. If Black people were innovating and creating global economic power the past 20 years, maybe your little cry for boycott would mean something. Who the hell said me or anything I do relies on Black folks or better yet, Americans? That’s funny…

    “A more constructive approach to the article would be…”

    No, a more constructive approach is to get off your behinds at the HBCU and start doing something for the Black community and that Black identity stuff you hiding behind. Stop looking at other people like me, HBCUs have student money, student body and there is resources that can be cobbled together to create innovation. Stop looking at everybody else instead of yourselves. I wish I had 2% of the free time and collective that an HBCU has.

    “Have you ever been to Howard University Hospital and seen their staff,versus Georgetown Hospital. Less than 15% of the doctors at Howard Hospital are white, mostly all black staff that serve a black community.”

    This is that anecdotal argument I was referring to earlier, thanks for not disappointing. We are talking innovation, not doctors and you forget to add Morehouse to that same argument. This is sad because I lost money betting someone will bring up Howard Medical school or Morehouse medical school as an anecdotal.

    “You feed into the stereotypical ideology of “the white man’s ice is colder”

    I’m not a white man and my ice is colder than the innovation labs inside of HBCUs. No one mentioned the white man because if they are American, they are extremely irrelevant in any discussion about global competitiveness and innovation when India, Asian, Brazilian and African innovators are exploding on the scene. How many times President Obama himself kept saying this – that we got to compete against people in other countries? He said exactly what I stated at Morehouse and the Urban League convention in speeches directly to Black people..why is people having amnesia?

    My goodness – this is extremely embarrassing you still on that black/white crap in 2013 with all the global competitiveness going on. Is that all they do in HBCU, stay fixed on “the white man ice” as you put it?

    “are you suggesting that these state schools and ivy league colleges do not engage in the same behavior?”

    They have innovation labs, they can act anyway they want as long as they innovating. Anybody like a HBCU not having an innovation lab or center of excellence, no university spin-offs with no patents and not solving modern urban problems using their student body like these HBCUs but up there dancing to their marching band playing a 2Chainz theme during halftime, those are some fools.

  5. Once again Mr. Ed!

    I didnt ask what you did with other countries. I specifically asked how and when did you collaborate with an HBCU? If you specifically chose to buypass HBCUs then you have lost all regards for your people, and thats sad. You would rather laugh and ridicule a people that are down instead of lifting them up with whatever knowledge you possess…….. thats sick!

    Have you ever donated money to an HBCU? Which specific HBCU’ did you contact about implementing this model, specifically? Who specifically did you talk to, to see if they are already working on these models,specific names?

    You realize, that if not for HBCUs, half of the black middle class would not exist? Have you researched Hampton’s Proton Therapy Lab? What are you doing to elevate HBCUs and the young black students who were not accepted into ivy league and state schools, buy given a chance at HBCUs. You need to check yourself. Where did you go to school? Excellence is not defined by one model you endorse.

    Mr.ED, please provide us the weblink, research and publications that show YOUR productivity in this arena, AND NOT BLOG POSTS!

    1. “I didnt ask what you did with other countries. I specifically asked how and when did you collaborate with an HBCU? If you specifically chose to buypass HBCUs then you have lost all regards for your people, and thats sad. ”

      Of course you cannot ask what I did with other countries, that is outside the box of your narrow tunnel-vision HBCU mentality – the only thing that you guys can think is black/white and not global.

      “You realize, that if not for HBCUs, half of the black middle class would not exist?”

      No, that’s incorrect and uneducated- the majority of the black middle class exist because of being employed by businesses, not some HBCUs. Are you saying HBCU employ half the black middle class? 🙂

      “Have you ever donated money to an HBCU? Which specific HBCU’ did you contact about implementing this model, specifically? Who specifically did you talk to, to see if they are already working on these models,specific names?”

      “What are you doing to elevate HBCUs and the young black students who were not accepted into ivy league and state schools, buy given a chance at HBCUs. ”

      “Where did you go to school?”

      “Mr.ED, please provide us the weblink, research and publications that show YOUR productivity in this arena, AND NOT BLOG POSTS!”

      These questions are nothing but blather and trying to delay and distract. Everybody ask these questions then don’t show up when the answers don’t suit them so I don’t waste my time on this stuff, homey. Please read my posting about where I explained explicitly about how I care about these kind of conversations. Notice I’m talking about HBCUs but you personally trying to talk about me. Notice you are not talking about anything else but personally me.

      Maybe you don’t notice but let me help you – the only reason I’m even letting your irrelevant and illogical posting remain here is to show the mentality of someone who obviously went to one of these HBCUs and how they are mentality conditioned to go after other Blacks instead of solve problem – demonstrating perfectly why HBCUs are a joke…

      Remember, the first thing that you done, Mr. Wilborn was figure out how to go after Mr. ED — don’t lie and say you didn’t do that because you did. That is how we know you HBCU guys are not about solving problems even after someone explain the problem..your first instinct was to go after me, not validate the problem and find a solution (which is what my majority white public university taught me what to do first…)

  6. I’m honestly 100% convinced by A Wilborn commentary that HBCUs foster a negative Black culture where Black students go after each other instead of work with each other. They form cliques and then they attack others and pass judgement on one another. These HBCUs pretend they are some Black educational utopia then you see this mentality rear it ugly head.

    Notice not one line of solution – just yelling, threats of boycott, “what are you doing?!” coming out of the man mouth. My goodness, this is exactly what HBCUs are festering in these Black students head and somebody going to be 100% and bring this..this cannot be tolerated, not in this day in age and cannot be afforded.

    This is a serious problem because this mentality prevents collective innovation from occurring. And A Wilborn honestly think he is fully capable of creating solutions when he cannot control himself as a Black man and automatically sought to go after another Black man. And then wonders why we made the decision Black people like him ain’t cut out to do anything for our people and does more harm than good in the effort to make real progress.

    What you doing? Show me what you doing? The only people who talk like that are people who ain’t doing nothing themselves. Think about this – I never asked nobody ever in my life what are they doing because I’m doing something myself and don’t need to worry about others – I’m doing it. Whenever you see anybody start going into the “what are you doing?” thing, trust me, they ain’t doing nothing….

  7. because I’m doing something myself and don’t need to worry about others

    was on my son about this yesterday. got to, Got To, GOT TO!!! have something of your own, that stems exclusively from your agency at all times – such that you can never experience the ultimate wastefulness of life – which is boredom.

    As long as one has life, there can never be any excuse for being bored….,

  8. I honestly don’t know why you are attacking HBCUs. Their positive record speaks for itself, and don’t need me or anyone else to defend it. There are certainly negative aspects to attending HBCUs; but as someone who has also attended a large state university and an Ivy League school, I would say there are positive & negative aspects to all of them.

    I am a proud HBCU grad, and my record in STEM industries, of helping black people, and striving for self-determination for my people speaks for itself, so I don’t feel as defensive as sad that you would launch such a negative attack on your blog.

    I will say that even in the early 90s, when I was a lowly physics major in my HBCU, my department had external partnerships that resulted in real pure science being done and real technology development. Not every prosperous partnerships to come out of an HBCU will make the front pages of white or boule media.

    I also hope that you can actively reach out to the impressionable young minds attending the HBCUs, and create the partnerships you would like to see.

    Peace,

    CL

    1. Why is it in the Black community, where there is problems being discussed with so-called Black institutions, it is viewed as “attack” or the need to be defensive of status quo Black institutions regardless of the problem? HBCUs positive record and accomplishments in comparison to what, traditional 4-year institutions? Other than warm and fuzzy feeling, what are the HBCUs offering any Black student in terms of differential other than some sense of feeling of “black closeness”?

      If there is anything to discuss about benefits of a university system, it is the intellectual property and the benefit it provides to the community or demographic it serve. University hospitals, university center of excellence..this is a real discussion if we are going to about what colleges and universities offer the community and students.

      What i’m hearing and I believe i’m also believe you hinted at is job placement – again, should I believe HBCUs offer a stronger job placement for minority students over a traditional university? What good is job placement nowadays when the recent millennial and gen-y students are having a tough time finding jobs after graduation – why is this a talking point, job placement?

      Right now, the one relevant point is cultivating innovators and entrepreneurs – it takes an ecosystem to accomplish that. If HBCUs are focused on job placement as a staple of success and it seems that is the only thing I see bring brought to the table here, then maybe that explains the strange reaction from me? What is not happening and what has not been happening is cultivating innovation and entrepreneurship to solve problems in the Black community.

      It is pure anecdotal to use you and your work as an exception to the rule when overall HBCUs do not foster this kind of activity among a Black student body. There is nothing to argue or debate except bruised egos – the net result would be an abundance of innovation going on to solve Black community problems and African Diaspora solution coming out of HBCUs and the net result is not coming out of HBCUs. Other cultures are doing for their Diaspora and their schools teaches foster this kind of creativity, including African higher education.

      Let’s stop making excuses for HBCUs and if it called an attack, then maybe it’s time to go to real war to make people wake up and realize we need to focus on the HBCU purpose just as much as most want to blame the Black church for the Black community current status and situation.

      1. uh…, if the black church could do what the catholic church does wrt schools, then we wouldn’t need to have any of these discussions, ever, at all. nogroes need to stop all their fronting and faking and get real about just how incompetent black leadership – at all levels – has been over the past 40 years.

        Oh, and a people gets the quality of leadership that it deserves.

  9. Ed, I will take your response piece by piece. But I think core problem with your arguments here is that, while I and the other poster came with anecdotes and single examples, you don’t even have this to support your claims. Your claims are not tied to any facts or examples. Your lack of information about the many programs you claim don’t exist is not proof.

    I am not defending the problems of black colleges, which in fact, the strongest criticism comes from its graduates. But there is a difference in coming with a fact-based criticism and writing a few paragraphs of unsupported innuendos.

    I must also stress again that if you see a gap in what universities are offering, why don’t you go and create partnerships with people and the students in these institutions? When I was a student, full of idealism, if some old head offered to show me a new way to directly improve the black community with technology, I would have jumped at the chance.

    “Why is it in the Black community, where there is problems being discussed with so-called Black institutions, it is viewed as “attack” or the need to be defensive of status quo Black institutions regardless of the problem?”

    —These are your first words: “You guys have just been briefed why HBCUs ain’t worth talking about and are garbage.” You didn’t just criticize HBCUs, you said they were garbage at the front. Is that a way to start a constructive dialogue about anything? If that isn’t an attack, what is it?

    “Other than warm and fuzzy feeling, what are the HBCUs offering any Black student in terms of differential other than some sense of feeling of “black closeness”?”
    — An education, same as any other legitimate university. And I wouldn’t discount the value of “closeness” and having peers and professors take it for granted that you are an intelligent student worth teaching.

    “If there is anything to discuss about benefits of a university system, it is the intellectual property and the benefit it provides to the community or demographic it serve. University hospitals, university center of excellence..this is a real discussion if we are going to about what colleges and universities offer the community and students.”

    —How do you know black universities lack these? The fact is, they do in fact have centers of excellence, produce intellectual property, have hospitals and the rest of it!! Your post seems very uninformed.

    “What i’m hearing and I believe i’m also believe you hinted at is job placement – again, should I believe HBCUs offer a stronger job placement for minority students over a traditional university? What good is job placement nowadays when the recent millennial and gen-y students are having a tough time finding jobs after graduation – why is this a talking point, job placement?”

    — You are putting words in my mouth, but how do you know either way? Can we bring some facts into the discussion? You just assume that the white university’s ice is colder. In fact, I did not go directly into the job force after graduating from an HBCU, but on the graduate school. But my college experiences set the foundations for my subsequent moves and success.

    “Right now, the one relevant point is cultivating innovators and entrepreneurs – it takes an ecosystem to accomplish that. If HBCUs are focused on job placement as a staple of success and it seems that is the only thing I see bring brought to the table here, then maybe that explains the strange reaction from me? What is not happening and what has not been happening is cultivating innovation and entrepreneurship to solve problems in the Black community.”

    —You want black universities to fix the world? Not even white universities claim to do that. You want example of black universities helping the community. Plenty of examples exist, especially in your part of the woods.

    “It is pure anecdotal to use you and your work as an exception to the rule when overall HBCUs do not foster this kind of activity among a Black student body.”

    —- HOW do you know that? Pure unsupported rubbish. I am willing to listen to facts if you have any. But I have a rolodex full of black entrepreneurs, engineers, lawyers, doctors, and other black professionals that work in the community that will say otherwise.

    “There is nothing to argue or debate except bruised egos – the net result would be an abundance of innovation going on to solve Black community problems and African Diaspora solution coming out of HBCUs and the net result is not coming out of HBCUs.”

    —- Again, HOW do you know this doesn’t exist? Is it too much to ask you to prove your claims?

    Peace,

    CL

    1. Ok, so I’m hearing the “absence of evidence is not evidence of absence” logical flow to argue the HBCUs do have innovation centers, are actively solving problems for the Black community and have center of excellence to foster entrepreneurship. Just like WMDs, HBCU students want to tell us they exist but we need no evidence they do exist but now the “absence of evidence is not evidence of absence”….

      So why is Sid Creadle asking his students to cut their cornrows and braids? Job placement right? When people talk about Howard and Morehouse, aren’t we talking about residency, euphemism for job placement? When other HBCUs talk about job placement with Wall Street and other sectors such as engineering, aren’t we really talking about meeting affirmative action quotas to do business with the government? Let’s not have an intellectual dishonest conversation and know this is what HBCUs are really touting as accomplishments with their student body.

      Let’s re-calibrate to the original point of this article:

      **HBCU have no record of a university spin-off intellectual property to generate revenue and solve problems in the Black community**

      If HBCUs had university spin-offs, which is the point of this whole discussion..you know, like Gatorade comes from the University of Florida….then this discussion would be over, wouldn’t it? But it seems that we talking about everything else except the fact there is a track record of university spin-offs coming out of HBCUs and talking about job placement as an accomplishment ignoring the reality of global competitiveness of Indian and Chinese students taking those opportunities.

      The Innocence Project out of Northwestern, headed up by a professor and law students to free mostly Black people from death row…where is the HBCU equilivant? Oh, I forget, we Black folks start screaming and yelling 48 hours before dude is to be put to death and pray for a last minute intervention from the governor or the Supreme Court.

      I mean, honestly this is not about HBCU students and their school colors with the exception of why they are putting up with this. This is really a discussion about the HBCU facility refusing to create a bootstrap innovation environment and promoting a culture of Black entrepreneurship and we are still trying to establish success as getting a good job after college in the year 2013…

  10. A Wilbur,

    Get it in your head you not having a convo here on this topic or even on this blog anymore – you can go step somewhere homey and stop wasting your time posting drivel that I don’t even see except the trash can filling up. Real talk, you not part of the discussion and can move on, dude.

    We trying to have a discussion about HBCUs and their role here and this is a A and B convo, so C your way out somewhere…..

  11. “I must also stress again that if you see a gap in what universities are offering, why don’t you go and create partnerships with people and the students in these institutions? When I was a student, full of idealism, if some old head offered to show me a new way to directly improve the black community with technology, I would have jumped at the chance.”

    That sounds nice, but I have the same stories as every other old head who try to go to these institutions and see institutional status quo fighting to maintain status quo above everything else. As long as the student loan and grants pay the bills, who cares about anything above the curriculum?

    This is a two-prong argument so yall gonna lose anyway. You got the status quo HBCU academic facility who is not going to do anything above and beyond because their life career is academic and that is that salary career. They will move from educational system to education system and nothing personal. Then you have the HBCU student body – if they have not created their own innovation center to solve problems organically in the communities they come from, then what good are they to me? I don’t want them.

    So I ask and it’s a fair question and now we at the HBCU student body level – if they student body is not working together creating collective solutions, then what good is an HBCU other than being a race-based alternative to a traditional university or college?

    1. “Then you have the HBCU student body – if they have not created their own innovation center to solve problems organically in the communities they come from, then what good are they to me? I don’t want them.”

      I find this a very short-sighted and callous sentiment. These students are a precious commodity. If you think they should be acting a certain way, then show them the way. Lead by example. And give not expecting something in return.

  12. Last reply Ed.

    I don’t think it’s my job to do the research you should do, but it took me less than 2 minutes to go on Morehouse University’s website and find a page of institutes, including two that directly address entrepreneurship and serving the community: https://www.morehouse.edu/centers/ . And Morehouse isn’t even that big of a university.

    I also discovered that Howard has an IP Commercialization Center. http://ip.howard.edu/index.html . Is this the “garbage” you are talking about?

    Just two examples (not surprising to me, btw) that took less than 5 minutes to discover. If I had time to go down the list of colleges I would find more. But then, I don’t need to be convinced of the good that HBCUs are doing.

    Now you may not agree with the approach of these institutions, but don’t say they don’t exist, and don’t say they don’t get results. If you think they should be improved, do what many of us do: go directly to them and try to forge something new that helps. Ask to sit on a board of some institute, or go directly to the students with your ideas.

    Now imagine if you actually did some substantive research with the aim of improving HBCUs. You may actually discover some legitimate issue with which to offer a solution. Instead you waste time by posting ad hominem attacks on the very institutions you should be trying to improve.

    Peace,

    CL

    1. “Now you may not agree with the approach of these institutions, but don’t say they don’t exist, and don’t say they don’t get results.”

      What results are there from the HBCU for the Black community? Are solutions to the Black community something to agree to disagree about? Crime and violence in the Black community – any solutions? Urban revitalization solutions – especially around both Howard and Morehouse campus – any solutions? Self-sustaining economic development in the Black community – any solutions?

      These are not pick-and-choose or not what I like to see solutions – these are foundation solutions that need to be implemented. What good are Black doctors if the Black community cannot afford adequate health care? What good are winning business plan if they do not address fundamental problems in our community?

      I went though the patents at the Howard and i already done my research, let’s not say i didn’t, i rarely make claims without doing research. These are not patents that appear to even went commercial or deliver an ROI. Nor do i see any evidence of a university spin-off of the IP, the point of what I’m writing here.

      Again, university spin-offs fostering a culture of innovation among the student body to create a win-win for the HBCU, the students and the Black community. What are these ancedotals that does not address solving Black community problems? If HBCUs are not solving Black community problems, then what is their legitimization rationale? Why is that my responsibility all of a sudden?

      These students have more free time than my team and our efforts are commercialized when HBCU academics have more resources than me to go more with more.

      But i respect your position on this matter and not dismissing it. The next step will be to confront the HBCU academic and student body and ask them what the heck they doing. I have an idea and will follow through on it.

  13. Ed,

    Cobb’s synopsis of American governance is close to correct by my reckoning. http://cobb.typepad.com/cobb/2013/09/three-types-of-class.html

    As I see it, the problem you and I face, and the problem which for all intents and purposes I’ve thrown in the towel trying to correct, is that you and I are representatives of the alternative Slice. While we are permitted to work on behalf of the aims of the ruling elite, we are decidedly NOT permitted to work on behalf of black partisan interests. (by “permitted” I mean funded, aided, and abetted for profit) – As you know from long experience, trying to bootstrap anything legal and consequential is hard as hell.

    The trifling parasites who run HBCU’s, who sit in the congressional black caucus, who preach from sundry pulpits, who lack any semblance of bass in their voice but get a high profile spot on MSNBC, the WaPo, the Tribune, who comprise race-studies afrodemia, who have run every single city, school district, or other petit political institution they’ve gotten control of into the ground, these breath and britches buffoons are essentially handpicked by the ruling elite for their incompetence.

    Their incompetence, greed, status-seeking, and near-sighted pettiness – is all that is required to ensure that black folk don’t do shit, can’t have shit, and won’t be shit – thereby eliminating any potential competition for true governance viability. The fact that racial identity is sufficient to blind many(most) black folks to the actual underlying governance schema by which black affairs are run, is what accounts for the sentimental blindness of young brother Keto singing the praises of the tired troglodytes who take a little of his shine as though it were their own, “this fine young graduate of our institution who brings honor to our esteemed agricultural and technical university, yada, yada, yada…,”

    For all these A&T historical land grant colleges and universities, we sure don’t seem to have shit to show now after a century or more of all this historically black going on…., this is the status quo norm toward which you and I would pose a significant threat if actually allowed to do what it is that we do in the context of one or another of these institutions.

    The only thing worth doing any more is turning you back on the status quo, allying with others who are about doing things differently, and then competing ruthlessly and relentlessly against every single vestige of the status quo. Anything less than this nakedly Darwinian struggle, is not only merely conversation, it’s a recipe for abject failure. You cannot coexist and share a corner with its current occupant. You have to put that occupant six feet under and take it and everything it represents away from him. Real talk.

    1. Cnu, thanks for calling me young. 🙂

      Ed and Cnu, I obviously don’t agree with how you all see everything, but I hope for your success. I want our people to rise, no matter the path.

  14. Independence is a function of financial and regulatory self-sufficiency. Barring extra-judicial intervention in your affairs, it’s possible, just astonishingly difficult. Far more difficult than if you received the type of assistance granted to those who go-along to get-along….,

  15. Interesting outlook. I’m a Hampton University Graduate. Possibly our institutions don’t provide the level of direction that your position seems to point to. I actually have always believed that most colleges and universities provide educated employees and not necessarily innovators. Your mentions of the University Spin-Off Model in interesting and worth investigation. How do you view the research and business model of Hampton U’s Proton Therapy Center ? Keep up the work……. Great food for thought.

  16. You said, “Their alumni ain’t sh*t either, proud to graduate from there and like to run off at the mouth but always happen to ain’t got the big money to contribute back to the HBCU to help grow the institution. ” But then you contradict yourself by seeming to argue that the HBCU should not be supported.

    Many complain about the problems at our historic institutions but most, especially Black people like yourself, tend to take the f**k them attitude that you employ. The HBCU is the the closest thing to a working Black community that we have right now. The HBCU employs, educates, provides sustainable income for Black suppliers to grow their businesses, and supports research programs for Black researchers. Anyone who does not want to support that in a viable way then… f**k them. . I agree that the HBCU needs to transform their thinking and method of operation in a way that sets them apart instead of just being a quasi job, i.e. labor, factory for mainstream corporate America but let’s not throw the baby out with the bath water.

    We have a viable infrastructure at HBCUs that once was the home of the best and brightest in our community and the community at large. The best athletes in the country were at HBCUs until other universities found that the Black athlete could make them millions of dollars and they would not even have to educate them. Now those same institutions are taking our best and brightest minds and “white washing” them.

    An aside: nobody parties harder than white kids at HWCUs, especially in frat houses.

    These Black graduates go on and do the same thing that you often write about which is focus only on themselves and their success and have no interest in building and/or supporting the Black community which, ironically, is key to their long term success.

    The truth is we need to look at what resources we have available to us in our community and stop vilifying our institutions and each other so we can use what we have to better our position. We are not all going to agree on the methodology but we are probably all going to be correct in some way or another.

    The fact is, non HBCUs don’t need Dre’s money (or yours). If you or Dr. Dre or anyone else for that matter, have a program, and the financing for it, that you think an HBCU or other historically Black institution would be more relevant having then take it to them (like Bill Cosby did at Spelman). If after real honest conversation and feasibility study they decide not to take your money and use it for that program then you have a right to say “F.U”. to THAT institution but perhaps there is a another one that would love to have what you are offering at their HBCU and If it works others will follow.

    1. “The HBCU is the the closest thing to a working Black community that we have right now.”

      And just like the Black community, the HBCUs are crumbling fast under financial woes and nepotism. This is an emotional-based response appealing for me and others to have a favorable view of HBCUs and remain blinded to the fact there is nothing there and has been that way for several decades and generations.

      Why do I need to waste a second on feasibility study working with ineffectual HBCU institutions when emerging educational institutions in Africa who are doing more with less because they have a passionate drive for innovation and entrepreneurship to improve Africa is way more exciting?

      I’m asking for either someone to bring a true testimony of real efforts HBCUs are doing for Black empowerment and the Black community with intake from the Black student body. If I do not get it, I’m closing this article for future comments a my last commentary being the last word that won’t be pretty either….12/1/2013…clock is ticking…

  17. Mr. Dunn,

    If we use your argument we may as well get rid of African Americans (Black people) too because most of us are not doing s**t to benefit the “Black Community” either. All institutions need to make adjustments for the times (Blockbuster video learned that the hard way). This is not a emotional response it is a practical one. The infrastructure for HBCU to be a force is there it simply needs tweaking (or maybe an overhaul) to be viable and more importantly a leader.

    I am keenly aware of the issues, i.e. problems, at HBCUs and I am also aware of the benefits (yes there is something there). I went to an HBCU and most of my family went to non HBCUs and there are also issues, i.e. problems, for us at non HBCUs. You of all people should know what happens in America when there is no base in any arena of the Black community – the same thing that happened after the civil rights movement – a form of modern day slavery where the community did not support the their own institutions thus becoming un-empowered and dependent on the benevolence or whims of others to their own detriment. The conditions that plague our community are by design and took a continuous concerted effort (Rosewood, Greenwood, Archer and Pine, etc.) to get it to be sustainably poor with poor slave minded people. It comes down to our own strategic community effort and benevolence to change the mindset and provide the resources for sustainable change and growth.

    I agree with virtually all of your programs and almost non of your opinions but I read and recommend Dream and Hustle to my HBCU attending and non HBCU attending Black people because it has something that is viable… as does HBCUs.

    You can support whatever or whomever you choose but your words are tearing down the institution that you say needs to become viable or “f**kem”. How can it ever become viable if it does not exist? Is it your argument that it is somehow a destructive force in the Black community and should thus be destroyed? If that were the case I would be the first one there with a bulldozer.

  18. I must say though Mr. Dunn that it is great that you are stirring up this pot because that is the only way to have real meaningful change for the better.

  19. Ed says, “What results are there from the HBCU for the Black community? Are solutions to the Black community something to agree to disagree about? Crime and violence in the Black community – any solutions? Urban revitalization solutions – especially around both Howard and Morehouse campus – any solutions? Self-sustaining economic development in the Black community – any solutions?”

    “These are not pick-and-choose or not what I like to see solutions – these are foundation solutions that need to be implemented. What good are Black doctors if the Black community cannot afford adequate health care? What good are winning business plan if they do not address fundamental problems in our community? ”

    The same can be said about non HBCUs. Should we get rid of them too?

    1. Tommy,

      You are simply providing diversions and rhetoric which shows you have nothing to bring to the table on this matter.

      Actually Yale invented the HEAT map and also created a system that help determine Black youth who will be likely prone to crime violence and used for intervention leads that proven to work. Urban revitalization programs at NYU and University of Illinois Chicago also created urban solutions for the Black community that are widely documented. Some of these programs were initiated by professors using their own budgets and expertise.

      I do not understand why you are presenting to what you can consider a highly intelligent Black crowd here these kind of arguments and rhetoric. I’m trying to understand why you trying to defend an HBCU faculty and HBCU student body that cannot organically come up with innovations for their own communities and people.

      1. Ed, Those intervention solutions that help determine Black youth who will be likely prone to crime violence and used for intervention are also used to target Black youth other non beneficial purposes.

        I’m not defending I am simply not discarding an institution that can be fixed and a tremendous force. Perhaps they need minds like yours but you say f**k em (highly intelligent statement). We have the same goal and I believe HBCUs share that goal but maybe not the methodology. I do not have all the answers; neither do you and neither do they, but together WE do. And that’s all I’m saying… not arguing, not defending.

  20. Tommy,

    There is an answer – where is the innovation lab and center of excellence? That was discussed in this article. You are clearly running around in circles. Why would you say there is no answer or I don’t have the answer when I proposed one? Didn’t Dr. Dre created a center of excellence for USC? Didn’t I provided organic examples of innovation like Lycos, Yahoo and Mosaic?

    Come on, you squirreling around and not putting out anything except more and more chatter. How long does it take for a HBCU student body to create an organic innovation center? They could have created one by the time you write another long-winded response filled with diversions trying to have the last word….

    1. Ed,

      Short winded response.

      Read carefully. I did not say YOU did not have AN answer. I said you nor I, nor they have ALL of the answers but we could possibly collectively have MOST of the answers. I am not arguing with the fact there needs to be change. I am just bemoaning your f**k you attitude. I am in film production and on my own dime and time I have students at two HBCUs developing marketable projects that will implement your streaming media idea. I have an MFA but I am not in academia. I stick to my area of expertise.

      As I said in an earlier post:
      If we use your argument we may as well get rid of African Americans (Black people) too because most of us are not doing s**t to benefit the “Black Community” either. All institutions need to make adjustments for the times (Blockbuster video learned that the hard way). This is not a emotional response it is a practical one. The infrastructure for HBCUs to be a force is there it simply needs tweaking (or maybe an overhaul).

      Feel free to have the last word. I don’t want it.

  21. “The HBCU is the the closest thing to a working Black community that we have right now.”

    It’s interesting how back in the bad old days of James Crow, the “working black community” was kept working through the joint efforts of the black managerial/professional/technical classes who set standards of effort and achievement within those artificially segregated enclaves.

    Since civil rights and fair housing were enacted 45-50 years ago, objectively capable black managerial/professional/technical class folk have gone where ever their knowledge, skill, ability, talent, and wallets have enabled them to go, largely free of the artificial boundaries imposed by institutionalized segregation.

    IOW, the best and the brightest were no longer confined to HBCU’s and could go/work/be wherever their drive, interests and accomplishments took them. This means that the HBCU is now an anachronism. Stripped of its best and brightest, these institutions are run and controlled by 2nd/3rd string “talent” which lacks the ability to make a go of it in the global higher-ed arena.

    Up thread, I suggested that the Israeli military industrial entrepreneurial complex was a laudable model and why didn’t the HBCU’s seek to emulate these. However, Israel is constantly lamenting its falling number of nobel laureates because the self-segregated and underfunded Israeli academy is incapable of supporting the type of world-class research required to retain the best and brightest, with the consequence that these folks leave Israel and go wherever their drive, interests, and accomplishments will be best supported.

    It is long overdue time for HBCU’s to go the way of the dinosaur.

    1. It’s going to get worse since Ivy League schools are making room for more talent. I remember someone from Howard crying about Harvard taking care of low income students’ tuition costs. It’s the same thing that happened with the athletes. Can you blame Chris Webber for going to Ann Arbor? HBCUs didn’t have vision and thought that they were going to keep the best athletes. Now some of the more creative and visionary students are going to do the same as the athletes. Universities are playing the global fame with campuses overseas while our HBCUS are still struggling in the states with little to show right now. Given the choice between Howard and Georgetown where do you think most people will go?

  22. CNu, Vic78, Ed Dunn,

    Cnu says, “It is long overdue time for HBCU’s to go the way of the dinosaur.”

    Vic78 says, “Given the choice between Howard and Georgetown where do you think most people will go?”

    Ed Dunn says, “I’m trying to understand why you trying to defend an HBCU faculty and HBCU student body that cannot organically come up with innovations for their own communities and people”

    I think the thing all of you are misunderstanding about me is that I agree with you all to some degree. It is interesting Cnu that you made reference to the dinosaur. That is a creature that some would say became extinct because it could not adapt to the changing environment; when in fact in recent years it has been discovered that what happened with the dinosaur is that many species transformed, evolved if you will, into our modern day creatures (alligator, chicken, lizard, elephant, shark, whale, raptors etc.) that are able to thrive in the current environment. So yes, Cnu, I agree that the HBCU does need to go the way of the dinosaur or it will become extinct. Except for programs at some institutions like:

    Morehouse College Entrepreneurship Center (MCEC)
    http://www.mcecenter.com/‎

    and

    LEADS at Spelman Ninth College Women of Color Leadership Conference
    Strategic Leadership: Building Wealth, Entrepreneurship and Paying it Forward. http://www5.spelman.edu/about_us/distinction/leads/spelman.edu/about_us/distinction/leads/

    There are not many community based, international outreach, self-sustaining and entrepreneurship initiatives, at HBCUs right now, not to mention innovation labs.

    Vic78, you are correct in that most would choose to attend a non-HBCU given the choice unless there is a legacy component or cultural identity component that they are seeking. But non HBCUs are not sending out graduates that have been trained to take an interest in building up, solving, or sustaining the Black community either. I think the problem transcends the institution.

    Ed, I am not trying to defend the HBCU I am trying to save it (we’re talking billions of dollars at stake). If the HBCU student body doesn’t stop talking ish and support their schools that they so ardently support around homecoming they will most certainly die… and, Cnu, not the way the dinosaur did. By support I don’t just mean with money – I mean with initiatives that generate wealth for the university and the community at large; that give anyone of any ethnicity or nationality a reason to want to attend, and yes, with money.

    Honestly, in my profession, I hire people of various ethnicities and backgrounds and I have found that the quality of graduate has declined period, from non-HBCU and HBCU grads alike but I am more concerned about the Black community.

    There are not many self-sustaining entrepreneurship initiatives at HBCUs. I am not a Muslim or a member of the Nation of Islam but Farrakhan warned HBCUs about this 30 years ago. He said, that HBCUs ‘need to build Black businesses and a system of entrepreneurship to become self-sustaining because as long as you have to go to the white man with your hat in your hand begging for change you will be at his mercy and when he tires of you, you will cease to exist.’ When white philanthropists help fund HBCUs I believe they wanted to

    A) Make sure that we would not endeavor to attend white universities.
    B) Assuage some guilt
    C) Help us to be less or non-dependent on them.

    That last one is important because we have not fulfilled “C” and there are enough brilliant and wealthy HBCU and, Ed, non-HBCU graduates for “C” to have been fulfilled long ago. Bottom line for that issue is the slave mentality or, as you put it, ‘still nursing on that teat.’

    The HBCU is/has made the same mistake that we made during and shortly after the civil rights movement. Those businesses relied on the fact that their core customers had few options, due to Jim Crow, from which to choose and thus did not value them in a way that would cause the business to cater to those customers needs. When they had non Jim Crow competition from white businesses they needed to offer competing product and services AND they needed to offer some added value to give people a reason to keep shopping in the hood, because they also had to contend with the slave mentality that believes that what the white man, or any other for that matter, has is inherently better.

    I used to love to eat soul food in the hood but not only has the quality of the food gone down in terms of taste but the method of cooking has not adjusted to the dietary needs of the community in a way that provides healthier food. It is hard to find good quality soul food now even at some of the same restaurants that I used to go to. I eat at non soul food restaurants all the time and non “hood” one’s too. I enjoy it but I miss real good soul food and I miss the jewel of a restaurant that you could always find in the hood. Unless you have eaten at one of these places, you wouldn’t know what you are missing. It is the same for me with HBCUs. It used to be a place that was one of the key driving forces for innovation, community activism and yes, entrepreneurship in the Black community and abroad but it transformed into a negro job factory that would be dead already without white philanthropy i.e. guilt or Black cultural identity issues i.e. guilt.

    I agree with you gentlemen about what the HBCU has become; what it needs to do, and where it needs to go in order to thrive and survive. I just happen to want it to survive and grow and be self-sustaining just like I want my good soul food in the hood and with a collective multilayered effort it can.

    Now someone else please comment so that Ed does not accuse me of trying to have the last word.

    1. So Tommy, why is the student body at these HBCUs sitting pretty right now on 10/30/2013 and not doing anything to change?

      Why should I not be surprised on 10/31/2013 the HBCU student body will have zero to produce in terms of some form of organic progress towards innovation and securing their own future.

      We can talk as grown ups and grads but I already got my White school degree and good jobs. The current HBCU student body, what are they expecting when they graduate, a good job? I didn’t have BRIC competition but the current HBCU student body do so not being innovative and competitive like President Obama warned HBCUs a dozen times, why is the HBCU student body sitting pretty? Why would anybody hire them over cheap East European or Southeast Asian talent?

      In 4 years young Africans will master global trade relationships and renewable energy – what are HBCU student bringing other than a sense of entitlement in the global 21st century landscape. These HBCU students are the real BSrs out of this whole HBCU tragedy screenplay.

    2. When they had non Jim Crow competition from white businesses they needed to offer competing product and services AND they needed to offer some added value to give people a reason to keep shopping in the hood, because they also had to contend with the slave mentality that believes that what the white man, or any other for that matter, has is inherently better.

      Weren’t no slave mentality – there remains to this day a significant population of negroe purveyors of sub-par goods and services to negroe customers and constituents. For example, the catholic church operates some of the finest schools in the world, and operates them well and in service to the needs of its constituents. The negroe churches don’t operate shit except breath and britches parasitism.

      Ergo, negroes need to begin converting en masse to catholicism and leave that old jack-leg bullshit strictly alone.

      That nice white catholic school is better, safer, stronger, faster…., the same could be said for their hospitals, orphanages, etc…,

      It used to be a place that was one of the key driving forces for innovation, community activism and yes, entrepreneurship in the Black community and abroad but it transformed into a negro job factory that would be dead already without white philanthropy i.e. guilt or Black cultural identity issues i.e. guilt.

      Useless, arrogant, hierarchical, food-powered, make-work jobs at that, otherwise we’d have a Tuskeegee heavy industries combine going toe-to-toe with General Motors and Koch Industries, right? Rather, we have a lot of pompous, overdressed, managerially, professionally, and technically incompetent jiggaboos jaw-jacking about identity politics and trying to guilt fast-moving and competent brothers into “giving back” to maintain their tired status quo behinds.

  23. Ed,

    Actually I have degrees from HBCU and non HBCU institutions so I feel I have the best of both worlds and are uniquely qualified to be objective so, I will endeavor to find out the answer to your questions:

    “why is the student body at these HBCUs sitting pretty right now on 10/30/2013 and not doing anything to change?

    Why should I not be surprised on 10/31/2013 the HBCU student body will have zero to produce in terms of some form of organic progress towards innovation and securing their own future?”

    while I also endeavor to sound the alarm and save those HBCUs that are willing to be saved.

    Like most humans do who have bad habits or traditions and get a warning from their doctor that they need to make a change, but they go on as they were until they almost stroke out and die or collapse, THEN they get the fear of God and change; I believe that is, unfortunately, what it is going to take with the HBCU. But I ask that since you did not attend an HBCU that you do not underestimate the love, however misguided, that the grads have for the institution. Keep stirring the pot; keep raising the questions but, if you will, soften the judgement. Also, don’t underestimate man’s ability to miss the obvious.

  24. I plan on moving to Africa in the next 4-6 years and I am part of a program that teaches in my area of expertise there. They are coming up in a way that reminds me of the hood innovation that we used to have. But there are some not so cool things too. Not judging, just saying. I am about my people prospering everywhere.

    1. Cnu, I find it interesting that you and some others here (of all places) seem to revel in the potential death of an institution that is/was instrumental in the advancement of Black people worldwide. The non HBCU student, including you, Ed and me owes much of what they are able to accomplish and even their very presence at a non HBCU to these institutions. I fully understand the recognition that, if nothing is done, these institutions are headed toward obsolescence but to revel in it… correct me if I’m wrong.

      1. Tommy what you are expressing is nostalgia, not relevancy of HBCUs. How about someone take photos of HBCUs for a future cultural exhibition at the Smithsonian museum? I would love for us to see this exhibition together and hear everything you got to say about the pastime of HBCUs before proceeding to the Kermit the Frog exhibit.

        Online learning, collective and collaborative learning, organic innovation culture driven by the student body is the global competitive standard of education. That’s more exciting than nostalgia and HBCUs are not competing and quickly obsoleting themselves. Rhetoric won’t save them internal homegrown action will. And as someone impressed with 18-21 years old from emerging rapidly boarding to global brown skinned leadership, of course I will have a f-them attitude towards HBCUs

      2. Tommy, I can’t really add anything substantive to what Ed and Vic wrote, but I will conclude with the personal and anecdotal.

        I’m a recovering black partisan. This time 8 years ago I would be found sentimentally and naively representing on behalf of folks who wouldn’t or couldn’t represent for me. Hard won, bitter experience with folk given a race and ethnicity pass has left me clear eyed and utterly unsympathetic to the same.

        Bottomline, incompetence repeated often enough and for long enough is indistinguishable from malfeasance. By that measure, these HBCU administrators are scoundrels who need to be dispensed with quick, fast, and in a hurry before they disserve another generation of young people.

    2. What’s Coates’ problem? The world his son will live in as a twenty something is going to be radically different from the one Coates senior lived in. He really needs to let it go. You’ve got it made if the worst thing that happens is your son doesn’t want to go to the same school you went to.

  25. Ed, I get you and perhaps if you had a better appreciation for what HBCUs have done for you then your attitude would be different. My son was at a non HBCU and the discrimination was blatant and harsh but I do not harbor any ill will toward non HBCUs; I got my masters from a non HBCU.

    I agree with your illustration of the problem and even the solution just not the attitude. I think the NAACP and the SCLC are a joke too and I wish they would use their resources toward something more relevant to Black people than b.s. protesting, awards shows and infighting but I appreciate what they have done for me and others so just on that alone I can’t say f-them. I would understand their demise and I would morn it not revel in it (more for what it could have been) but I would truly rejoice in them becoming relevant again and not behind some Zimmerman ish but because they are dedicated to building the Black community.

    The only way I could revel in the demise of the HBCU as an institution is if/when something that is about Black people, supports Black people, advances Black people as a community domestically and globally, and instills a real appreciation of self comes along. And, I might add, is open to other ethnic groups and cultures to instill those principles in them.

    Cnu,

    You are right and I just hope those scoundrels that work at and in HBCUs don’t take the institution down with them. Now, I would so revel in the demise of those scoundrels. What happened at Grambling needs to happen all over the country until the scoundrels are displaced and some people who are about the aforementioned paragraph are in place.

    I believe we are on the same mission with different strategies. I am glad to know that there are some others out there who give a damn about the advancement of Black people as a whole and not just some “me, mine, and f-yall” ish that is preached in urban music everyday to our people.

    1. The only way I could revel in the demise of the HBCU as an institution is if/when something that is about Black people, supports Black people, advances Black people as a community domestically and globally, and instills a real appreciation of self comes along. And, I might add, is open to other ethnic groups and cultures to instill those principles in them.

      Wait, there’s black president in the white house signalling that “nothing shall be withheld from you that you imagine yourself to do” and yet black folks still got to have training wheels and a sandbox superintended by “just us” in order go and get ours?

      Tommy, do you read what you write before you click Post Comment?

      1. “Can’t we all just get along” kumbayah negroes are responsible for enabling the 2nd and 3rd string scrubs disserving HBCU constituents. That said, the real beauty of my uncompromising stance with regard to the ultimate fate of this anachronistic pastime and its sentimental supporters is its inevitability.

        Everything else is merely conversation….,

  26. Cnu,

    I see it’s hard for you to take yes for an answer huh? What do you think this site is? What do you think China for the Chinese? What do you think any non HBCU is? Seeing that you can not even take agreement and a complement I’m done talking to you.

    By the way, I don’t give race and ethnicity passes to anyone of ANY ethnicity especially the president. I hope that “nothing shall be withheld from you that you imagine yourself to do” and you go and get YOURS.

  27. Tommy, CagedLion

    Trying to get to the bottom of this – what is the point or end game here? Is speaking highly of HBCUs, looking for anecdotal going to save HBCUs from itself? Why the discussion of this nature at this point of time?

    This is why I mentioned the anecdotal in the article – the Black community always like to have “discussions” and “stories” as if this is a solution to Black issues. We can talk all day and night on this topic, but opinions do not change reality and do not understand Tommy why you not agreeing with my opinion matters to the state of the HBCUs and the everyday crumbling reality.

    The HBCU service model and operational model was exploited by Black parasitical opportunists who hid behind their own skin color and embedded themselves in Black institutions not for excellence, but because they knew they would get a pass for mediocre hiding behind their skin color. There is no viable self-sustaining revenue model and the fact there is no self-sustaining model created after 100 years (?) speaks loud.

    HBCUs were never meant to be a permanent solution and should have evolved but it didn’t. This is the core problem with Black identity – the constant thought of believing Black identity is a permanent solution. Africa is taking charge in the African Diaspora right now in the 21st century and we still have African-Americans clinging on to a 1970s-1980s kinte cloth wearing concept of Afrocentricity and want to keep that trend still going.

    Where is the HBCU online learning similar to University of Phoenix program to reach single moms and non-degreed working Blacks? Where is the examples of student body collaborative innovation efforts to solve a real problem in communities the student body come from? Where is the university spin-off initiatives? All of what I just stated was laid out in the article above and are self-sustaining revenue and service models that simply do not exist at HBCUs.

    Here is the problem that is bothering me from of all this talking – the Black community want to pretend 18-21 year old HBCU grads will have a leg in the race with 18-21 multilingual students from emerging countries who have collaborative learning and MIT free courses under their belt as well as international exposure. Only a strong-minded cognitive dissonance blinded by race-pride would believe HBCU students in their current context would be able to compete in 4 years on the global economy landscape.

    Can HBCUs change their service model to stay relevant? Well, seeing two HBCU alumni discuss the past and wonderful nostalgia of HBCUs instead of what HBCUs can do right now is not helping, Tommy and CagedLion….

    1. If we are going to say the HBCUs are a reflection of the Black community, then maybe the Arab Spring should be the reflection of the student body solution to deal with the problems of the HBCUs…

    2. “Here is the problem that is bothering me from of all this talking – the Black community want to pretend 18-21 year old HBCU grads will have a leg in the race with 18-21 multilingual students from emerging countries who have collaborative learning and MIT free courses under their belt as well as international exposure.”

      Why not? I did. 🙂

  28. The person who wrote this is a moron. Wherever a person goes a person should get the most out of everything. Not blame someone because it’s not to their standards. If u don’t like what’s going on then shut your fucking mouth and help fix the problem. Everyone is always all talk and quick to complain. Man the fuck up and make a difference. Do something with yourself you miserable fucks.

    1. Obviously you failed hard. Read a little more and research a little more and you will find out we are doing things here.

      See you assumed we wasnt doing shit because that is your weak ass mentality bro. You the moron for coming to Dream and Hustle and thinking we lame like you. I will fold my arms and smile as you scurry around and discover we about it and you disappear in shame because the only person who just talk shit was you…

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